~ America’s Independent Electric Light and Power Companies, March 1956via Flickr

~ America’s Independent Electric Light and Power Companies, March 1956
via Flickr

~ Manners in Business, Elizabeth Gregg MacGibbon, 1936

~ Manners in Business, Elizabeth Gregg MacGibbon, 1936

~ Shredded Wheat ad, c. 1913
via Suffrage Ephemera Collection, Special Collections Department, Bryn Mawr College Library"Every biscuit is a vote for health, happiness, and domestic freedom - a vote for pure food, for clean living and clean thinking."

~ Shredded Wheat ad, c. 1913
via Suffrage Ephemera Collection, Special Collections Department, Bryn Mawr College Library

"Every biscuit is a vote for health, happiness, and domestic freedom - a vote for pure food, for clean living and clean thinking."

~ The Home Manual. Everybody’s Guide in Social, Domestic and Business Life, 1889

~ The Home Manual. Everybody’s Guide in Social, Domestic and Business Life, 1889

~ Grove’s Bromo Quinine,  March 1929via Flickr Long notes today because I found the subject so interesting (yes, I’m weird). ;-)Flannel: “a woven cloth of wool or a blend of wool and cotton”. Historically, a “flannel” could also refer specifically to heavy underclothing made of this cloth. At some point in autumn to avoid “taking a chill”, people would switch out their lighter undergarments for heavier ones made of flannel. The summer underwear was packed away with the lighter clothes until spring when the process was reversed. Sometimes, in lieu of actual underwear, a person was “sewn in for the winter" i.e., rubbed with grease and then wrapped in layers of brown paper and flannel which was then sewn into place to serve as permanent cold protection until the weather warmed up. During my brief search I found anecdotal evidence of this as late as 1939. Grove’s Bromo Quinine among other things contained two grains of phenacetin, one of the first synthetic fever reducers to go on the market. Grove Laboratories, makers of Grover’s Bromo Quinine, were merged into Bristol-Myers Co. in the 1950’s.

Anyone have any more info on the official wearing of flannel for the winter?

~ Grove’s Bromo Quinine, March 1929
via Flickr

Long notes today because I found the subject so interesting (yes, I’m weird). ;-)

Flannel: “a woven cloth of wool or a blend of wool and cotton”. Historically, a “flannel” could also refer specifically to heavy underclothing made of this cloth. At some point in autumn to avoid “taking a chill”, people would switch out their lighter undergarments for heavier ones made of flannel. The summer underwear was packed away with the lighter clothes until spring when the process was reversed. Sometimes, in lieu of actual underwear, a person was “sewn in for the winter" i.e., rubbed with grease and then wrapped in layers of brown paper and flannel which was then sewn into place to serve as permanent cold protection until the weather warmed up. During my brief search I found anecdotal evidence of this as late as 1939.

Grove’s Bromo Quinine among other things contained two grains of phenacetin, one of the first synthetic fever reducers to go on the market. Grove Laboratories, makers of Grover’s Bromo Quinine, were merged into Bristol-Myers Co. in the 1950’s.

Anyone have any more info on the official wearing of flannel for the winter?

~ Social Etiquette or Manners and Customs of Polite Society, Maud C. Cooke, 1896

~ Social Etiquette or Manners and Customs of Polite Society, Maud C. Cooke, 1896

~ Beauty A Duty: The Art of Keeping Young, Susanna Cocroft, 1915

~ Beauty A Duty: The Art of Keeping Young, Susanna Cocroft, 1915

~ The Mentor: A Little Book for the Guidance of Such Men and Boys as would Appear to Advantage in the Society of Persons of the Better Sort, by Alfred Ayres, 1884via Hathi Trust Digital Library

~ The Mentor: A Little Book for the Guidance of Such Men and Boys as would Appear to Advantage in the Society of Persons of the Better Sort, by Alfred Ayres, 1884
via Hathi Trust Digital Library

~ The Habits of Good Society: A Handbook for Ladies and Gentlemen, 1871

~ The Habits of Good Society: A Handbook for Ladies and Gentlemen, 1871

~ The English Review, August 1918

~ The English Review, August 1918

~ The Woman’s Manual, Aurora Reed, 1916via Harvard University Library"Has your child a square jaw - not chin? He will voice immoderate praise or blame …. is a vicious traducer, and may be alcoholic some time."

~ The Woman’s Manual, Aurora Reed, 1916
via Harvard University Library

"Has your child a square jaw - not chin? He will voice immoderate praise or blame …. is a vicious traducer, and may be alcoholic some time."

~ Advice to Freshmen, G. Wahr (Publisher), 1921History note: According to the Stanford University site tubbing "involved pushing the victim’s head under water until he was so desperate for a breath that he "bubbled," opened his mouth to gasp."  Although the Stanford site claims that the practice of “tubbing” was forcefully ended in 1916 by replacing the bathtubs with showers, apparently the University of Michigan tolerated it quite a bit longer.

~ Advice to Freshmen, G. Wahr (Publisher), 1921

History note: According to the Stanford University site tubbing "involved pushing the victim’s head under water until he was so desperate for a breath that he "bubbled," opened his mouth to gasp." Although the Stanford site claims that the practice of “tubbing” was forcefully ended in 1916 by replacing the bathtubs with showers, apparently the University of Michigan tolerated it quite a bit longer.

~ Principles of Politeness, and of Knowing the World. By the late Lord Chesterfield. Methodified and digested under distinct Heads, With Additions, By the Rev. Dr. John Trusler: Containing Every Instruction necessary to complete the GENTLEMAN and MAN OF FASHION; to teach him a Knowledge of Life, and make him well received in all Companies, 1786via Internet Archive

~ Principles of Politeness, and of Knowing the World. By the late Lord Chesterfield. Methodified and digested under distinct Heads, With Additions, By the Rev. Dr. John Trusler: Containing Every Instruction necessary to complete the GENTLEMAN and MAN OF FASHION; to teach him a Knowledge of Life, and make him well received in all Companies, 1786
via Internet Archive

~ Outsmart the Smart Guy, American Social Hygiene Association, 1951-1954via University of Minnesota

~ Outsmart the Smart Guy, American Social Hygiene Association, 1951-1954
via University of Minnesota

~ Kodak, Photoplay Magazine, May 1924

~ Kodak, Photoplay Magazine, May 1924