~ Country Gentleman, July 12, 1919via Flickr

~ Country Gentleman, July 12, 1919
via Flickr

~ Social Etiquette or Manners and Customs of Polite Society, Maud C. Cooke, 1896

~ Social Etiquette or Manners and Customs of Polite Society, Maud C. Cooke, 1896

~ Manners in Business, Elizabeth Gregg MacGibbon, 1936

~ Manners in Business, Elizabeth Gregg MacGibbon, 1936

~ How to Be a Lady, Harvey Newcomb, 1850

~ How to Be a Lady, Harvey Newcomb, 1850

~ Student’s Hand-book of Meredith College, Raleigh, North Carolina; 1919-1920

~ Student’s Hand-book of Meredith College, Raleigh, North Carolina; 1919-1920

~ Hammond Organ, November 1953"How much longer are you going to live with that vague discontented feeling that your leisure time ought to give you more out of life than you’re getting?"

~ Hammond Organ, November 1953


"How much longer are you going to live with that vague discontented feeling that your leisure time ought to give you more out of life than you’re getting?"

(Source: flickr.com)

~ The Ladies’ Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners; or, Miss Leslie’s Behaviour Book, a Guide and Manual for Ladies, by Eliza Leslie, 1864via Open Library*Tips for getting your luggage through customs when traveling, circa 1864

~ The Ladies’ Guide to True Politeness and Perfect Manners; or, Miss Leslie’s Behaviour Book, a Guide and Manual for Ladies, by Eliza Leslie, 1864
via Open Library

*Tips for getting your luggage through customs when traveling, circa 1864

~ The Woman’s Manual, Aurora Reed, 1916

~ The Woman’s Manual, Aurora Reed, 1916

~ Milton Bradley’s “The World’s Best” Games catalog, circa 191(?)
~ The Modern Retailer, v. 1, 1915via Hathi Trust  Digital Library

~ The Modern Retailer, v. 1, 1915
via Hathi Trust Digital Library

~ Kent’s New Commentary: A Manual for Young Men, by C.H. Kent, 1880Geek Note: a “Boy’s Paper”, or “Penny Dreadful”, was the popular name for fiction published on cheap pulp paper and aimed primarily at working class adolescent boys. It was usually overdramatic and full of unlikely feats of heroism and derring-do. One of the most popular characters to come out of the penny dreadfuls was Jack Harkaway, Schoolboy Adventurer. You can read one of the Jack Harkaway adventures at Project Gutenburg, or download it complete with illustrations. It should be noted that Questionable Advice cannot be held responsible for any acts of highway robbery you may commit under the influence of this story.Extra Geeky Note: dedicated Dr. Who fans may recall that the Master of the Land of Fiction was the “writer of 'The Adventures of Captain Jack Harkaway' in The Ensign, a magazine for boys.”

~ Kent’s New Commentary: A Manual for Young Men, by C.H. Kent, 1880



Geek Note: a “Boy’s Paper”, or “Penny Dreadful”, was the popular name for fiction published on cheap pulp paper and aimed primarily at working class adolescent boys. It was usually overdramatic and full of unlikely feats of heroism and derring-do. One of the most popular characters to come out of the penny dreadfuls was Jack Harkaway, Schoolboy Adventurer. You can read one of the Jack Harkaway adventures at Project Gutenburg, or download it complete with illustrations. It should be noted that Questionable Advice cannot be held responsible for any acts of highway robbery you may commit under the influence of this story.

Extra Geeky Note: dedicated Dr. Who fans may recall that the Master of the Land of Fiction was the “writer of 'The Adventures of Captain Jack Harkaway' in The Ensign, a magazine for boys.”

~ The Sunday Morning Star, April 23, 1939

~ The Sunday Morning Star, April 23, 1939

~ A Child’s Guide to Reading, by John Macy, 1909

~ A Child’s Guide to Reading, by John Macy, 1909

~ Nerlich &. Co., Toronto, Canada; General Catalogue, Season 1938-1939
via Library and Archives Canada(click to enlarge)"Negress Dolls. Smart Pickaninny Models"

~ Nerlich &. Co., Toronto, Canada; General Catalogue, Season 1938-1939
via Library and Archives Canada
(click to enlarge)

"Negress Dolls. Smart Pickaninny Models"

~ Sears catalog, 1964via wishbookweb"Little gals love it because there’s so much to do."

~ Sears catalog, 1964
via wishbookweb

"Little gals love it because there’s so much to do."