dandyads:

~ Smith Brothers’ Cough Drops, 1918"Just enough charcoal to sweeten the stomach and aid digestion."

dandyads:

~ Smith Brothers’ Cough Drops, 1918

"Just enough charcoal to sweeten the stomach and aid digestion."
~ The English Review, August 1918

~ The English Review, August 1918

~ Trench and Camp (Camp Upton, Long Island, N.Y. edition), May 20, 1919via University of Minnesota

~ Trench and Camp (Camp Upton, Long Island, N.Y. edition), May 20, 1919
via University of Minnesota

~ The English Review, May 1915

~ The English Review, May 1915

~ The Mirror of Australia, (Sydney, NSW),  October 23, 1915via Trove"…no connection with Germans - either naturalised or unnaturalised. It’s a National Drink and a National Sentiment that prompts Australians to Drink it."

~ The Mirror of Australia, (Sydney, NSW), October 23, 1915
via Trove

"…no connection with Germans - either naturalised or unnaturalised. It’s a National Drink and a National Sentiment that prompts Australians to Drink it."

Tags: food retro WWI

~ New York Tribune, June 22, 1919"Went to War! Home Again"

~ New York Tribune, June 22, 1919

"Went to War! Home Again"

(Source: sparkygirl63)

~ Government War Advertising, Report of the Division of Advertising, 1918(click to enlarge)"German agents are everywhere….Report the man who spreads pessimistic stories, divulges - or seeks - confidential military information, cries for peace, or belittles our efforts to win the war.Send the names of such persons, even if they are in uniform, to the Department of Justice, Washington.”

~ Government War Advertising, Report of the Division of Advertising, 1918
(click to enlarge)

"German agents are everywhere….Report the man who spreads pessimistic stories, divulges - or seeks - confidential military information, cries for peace, or belittles our efforts to win the war.
Send the names of such persons, even if they are in uniform, to the Department of Justice, Washington.”

~ Trench and Camp newspaper, (Camp Upton, Long Island, N.Y. edition), Volume 2, Number 33, May 20, 1919via 
University of Minnesota Libraries"If the fabric were not so modest of pattern the jacket sketched might be considered audacious."

~ Trench and Camp newspaper, (Camp Upton, Long Island, N.Y. edition), Volume 2, Number 33, May 20, 1919
via University of Minnesota Libraries

"If the fabric were not so modest of pattern the jacket sketched might be considered audacious."

~ British Home Front poster, c. 1914-1918via Imperial War Museum

~ British Home Front poster, c. 1914-1918
via Imperial War Museum

~ UK WWI Recruitment Campaign poster, 1914-1916via Imperial War Museum

~ UK WWI Recruitment Campaign poster, 1914-1916
via Imperial War Museum

~ National War Savings Committee Poster No. 7, Great Britain, 1916via Imperial War Museums

~ National War Savings Committee Poster No. 7, Great Britain, 1916
via Imperial War Museums

Tags: retro fashion WWI

~ The County Gentleman and Land & Water, July 1915via Internet Archive"In these days of nervous strain the soothing influence of motoring in a Daimler with the silent Sleeve Valve Engine, is appreciated at its proper worth. … Arrangements for delivery after the War can now be made."

~ The County Gentleman and Land & Water, July 1915
via Internet Archive

"In these days of nervous strain the soothing influence of motoring in a Daimler with the silent Sleeve Valve Engine, is appreciated at its proper worth. … Arrangements for delivery after the War can now be made."

~ The County Gentleman and Land & Water, November 20, 1915"Special Discount off all Jig-Saw Puzzles sold for use of Wounded Sailors and Soldiers"

~ The County Gentleman and Land & Water, November 20, 1915

"Special Discount off all Jig-Saw Puzzles sold for use of Wounded Sailors and Soldiers"

~ Salaspin, July 1917
via Grace’s Guide "Replaces German aspirin"
Notes from aspirin history: Bayer, a German company,  first patented  Aspirin on February 27, 1900. The name Aspirin came from the ‘A” in acetyl chloride, the “spir” in spiraea ulmaria (the plant they derived the salicylic acid from) and the ‘in’ was a then familiar name ending for medicines.

Aspirin was first sold as a powder. In 1915, the first Aspirin tablets were made. Interestingly, Aspirin ® and Heroin ® were once trademarks belonging to Bayer. After Germany lost World War I, Bayer was forced to give up both trademarks as part of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. (source)

~ Salaspin, July 1917
via Grace’s Guide

"Replaces German aspirin"


Notes from aspirin history: Bayer, a German company, first patented Aspirin on February 27, 1900. The name Aspirin came from the ‘A” in acetyl chloride, the “spir” in spiraea ulmaria (the plant they derived the salicylic acid from) and the ‘in’ was a then familiar name ending for medicines.

Aspirin was first sold as a powder. In 1915, the first Aspirin tablets were made. Interestingly, Aspirin ® and Heroin ® were once trademarks belonging to Bayer. After Germany lost World War I, Bayer was forced to give up both trademarks as part of the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. (source)

~ English Review, December 1915(click to enlarge)

~ English Review, December 1915
(click to enlarge)