~ Grove’s Bromo Quinine,  March 1929via Flickr Long notes today because I found the subject so interesting (yes, I’m weird). ;-)Flannel: “a woven cloth of wool or a blend of wool and cotton”. Historically, a “flannel” could also refer specifically to heavy underclothing made of this cloth. At some point in autumn to avoid “taking a chill”, people would switch out their lighter undergarments for heavier ones made of flannel. The summer underwear was packed away with the lighter clothes until spring when the process was reversed. Sometimes, in lieu of actual underwear, a person was “sewn in for the winter" i.e., rubbed with grease and then wrapped in layers of brown paper and flannel which was then sewn into place to serve as permanent cold protection until the weather warmed up. During my brief search I found anecdotal evidence of this as late as 1939. Grove’s Bromo Quinine among other things contained two grains of phenacetin, one of the first synthetic fever reducers to go on the market. Grove Laboratories, makers of Grover’s Bromo Quinine, were merged into Bristol-Myers Co. in the 1950’s.

Anyone have any more info on the official wearing of flannel for the winter?

~ Grove’s Bromo Quinine, March 1929
via Flickr

Long notes today because I found the subject so interesting (yes, I’m weird). ;-)

Flannel: “a woven cloth of wool or a blend of wool and cotton”. Historically, a “flannel” could also refer specifically to heavy underclothing made of this cloth. At some point in autumn to avoid “taking a chill”, people would switch out their lighter undergarments for heavier ones made of flannel. The summer underwear was packed away with the lighter clothes until spring when the process was reversed. Sometimes, in lieu of actual underwear, a person was “sewn in for the winter" i.e., rubbed with grease and then wrapped in layers of brown paper and flannel which was then sewn into place to serve as permanent cold protection until the weather warmed up. During my brief search I found anecdotal evidence of this as late as 1939.

Grove’s Bromo Quinine among other things contained two grains of phenacetin, one of the first synthetic fever reducers to go on the market. Grove Laboratories, makers of Grover’s Bromo Quinine, were merged into Bristol-Myers Co. in the 1950’s.

Anyone have any more info on the official wearing of flannel for the winter?