~ Hartford Weekly Times - January 2, 1890(click to enlarge)"How many, in the secrets of their own hearts, rejoice when Christmas is over, and wish that it would stay over for much more than a twelve-month!"But not to make too fine a point on the philosophy of the thing, it is apparent to the shallowest observer that this annual gift making is, of late years, carried to an excess that makes a burden of Christmas instead of a pleasure. The most joyous festival in the calendar is turned into a weariness and a dread to a large number of people, for what is more wearisome than the wearisome round of the shops in a vain attempt to solve the problem of purchasing pretty, if not aesthetic, presents, out of a treasury that runs far below the needs of the occasion? How many, in the secrets of their own hearts, rejoice when Christmas is over, and wish it would stay over for much more than a twelve-month? Can there not be a combination of both the wealthy and those of limited means, that this excessive gift-making may be reduced to more reasonable limits, to the relief of those of modest means, and to the re-establishing of the festival on the old joyous basis?

~ Hartford Weekly Times - January 2, 1890
(click to enlarge)

"How many, in the secrets of their own hearts, rejoice when Christmas is over, and wish that it would stay over for much more than a twelve-month!"

But not to make too fine a point on the philosophy of the thing, it is apparent to the shallowest observer that this annual gift making is, of late years, carried to an excess that makes a burden of Christmas instead of a pleasure. The most joyous festival in the calendar is turned into a weariness and a dread to a large number of people, for what is more wearisome than the wearisome round of the shops in a vain attempt to solve the problem of purchasing pretty, if not aesthetic, presents, out of a treasury that runs far below the needs of the occasion? How many, in the secrets of their own hearts, rejoice when Christmas is over, and wish it would stay over for much more than a twelve-month? Can there not be a combination of both the wealthy and those of limited means, that this excessive gift-making may be reduced to more reasonable limits, to the relief of those of modest means, and to the re-establishing of the festival on the old joyous basis?